Wednesday, March 23, 2011

English Idioms - Acid Test, Cock and Bull Story and A Dark Horse

English Idioms - Acid Test, Cock and Bull Story and A Dark Horse

1.       A snake in the grass (a false friend)
Be careful; your new friend is a snake in the grass.
2.       At a stretch (consecutively; without a break)
He can walk five miles at a stretch.
3.       All abroad (in error)
I am afraid you are all abroad in your assessment of the situation.

4.       Acid test (crucial test)
Not to deceive in any matter is the acid test of a great character.
5.       An iron will (an indomitable determination)
Napoleon was a man of iron will.
6.       A thorn in flesh (a continual cause of annoyance)
His presence in the function was a thorn in my flesh.
7.       A cock and bull story (an incredible story)
I cannot be taken in by this cock and bull story.
8.       Make allowance for (take into consideration)|
We must make some allowance for her inexperience.
9.       At arm’s length (in a state of formality and unfriendliness).
He prefers to keep his neighbours at arm’s length.
10.   A laughing stock (target of ridicule)
On account of his strange ways, he has made himself a laughing tock of his friends.
11.   A white elephant (a costly possession useless to its owner)
This old car is a white elephant for me.
12.   At the eleventh hour (in the nick of time)
The meeting was put off at the eleventh hour because the   chairman had fallen sick.
13.   A man of spirit (a bold, brave person)
Sher Shah Suri was a man of spirit.
14.   A black sheet (an unreliable person; a man of ill repute)
There are black sheep in every community.
15.   Against the grain (contrary to one’s nature/inclination)
I cannot shake hands with a cheat; it is against my grain.
16.   A jail bird ( a person who has spent a long time in jail)
A jail bird like him does not deserve any leniency.
17.   At daggers drawn (hostile/inimical to)
The Americans are at daggers drawn with the Russians these days.
18.   At all events (in any case)
He has resolved to help me at all events.
19.   At one’s wit’s end (baffled; bewildered)
He was at his wit’s end and did not know how to cope with the situation.
20.   A dark horse (a person whose qualities are unknown)
He rose to prominence all of a sudden; he was actually a dark horse.

People who read this post also read :



1 comments:

Manjot kaur said...

Wow!!! Honestly speaking you are really a great writer. What I required I got it. Thank you so much...


Best IELTS Training in Adelaide
Best IELTS Coaching in Adelaide
Best OET Coaching Adelaide
OET Coaching in Adelaide

Post a Comment

Please leave your comments!